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November 05, 2004

Comments

David Fiore

1980 will indeed live in infamy Marc! I pretty much became a six-year old political junkie right there--it started with good news when Canada held its second federal election in less than a year when Clark's Conservative government collapsed and we brought Trudeau back, got crazy with the first Sovereignty Referendum and everyone on the block wondering about a Civil War, and then my family watched in horror as Reaganomics and "Moral Values" began their corrosive assault upon the American Mind (and the remnants of the Great Society").

I've never been a fan of Conway's superteam writing Marc (Spider-Man yes, and Firestorm too, but not JLA, or any of his Marvel team writing...), but yeah, I think I can see why you'd link this Superman's rhetoric with mine--I like "truth and justice" a lot more when you remove "the American Way" from the formulation (not because I don't have a lot of respect for the original New England Way, mind you--but because you can't count on modern-day Americans to understand the complexities of that particular Way!) There's a big difference between a moral life and adherence to a "moral code".

Dave

Captain Spaulding

Actually it's an international coalition - you've got the British Batman and Robin from the old Club of Heroes story, the Irish guy from the Global Guardians, and a haiku-spouting Japanese (I presume) guy. That's half the team, possibly more since I don't know the nationalities of the other four. And it's not like it's the first team a villain destroyed a city as bait to capture a super-team.

If only the UltraMarines would try to understand Gorilla Grodd and why he hates humanity and be more tolerant of his cultural differences, there wouldn't be all this nasty war which was started so Wayne Corporation would get the rebuilding contracts.

matt rossi

I'm with Batman on this one: Zatanna's mom had herself one creepy funeral.

If only the UltraMarines would try to understand Gorilla Grodd and why he hates humanity and be more tolerant of his cultural differences, there wouldn't be all this nasty war which was started so Wayne Corporation would get the rebuilding contracts.

Or maybe if they would try to understand Gorilla Grodd, they could learn to anticipate what he's going to do (read this as: if the United States had bothered to understand Saddam Hussein and Iraq, we would have seen that there was an insurgency set up to fight us in a guerilla manner - that wasn't a pun - and could have been prepared to fight the war they actually ended up in). Understanding doesn't have to be touchy-feely: know your enemy is still a good goddamn game plan in war. Even if you have overwhelming military force on your side.

Marc

Yes, the Ultramarines are international, but then Tony Blair is one of them furriners too. And in case you didn't notice it, Spaulding, or didn't read the interviews, or did notice it and would prefer not to, Morrison has rewritten them into an analogue of Millar's "Do You Think This 'A' Stands For France" Ultimates (with a little Ultimate Spider-Man thrown in).

In any case, Morrison's comic makes a poor example for your liberal caricature, since he recognizes that Grodd is a threat, he just thinks the Ultramarines' way of handling it - arrogant, confident in their technological superiority - is completely mistaken. Morrison's recent work has been just as critical of the dangers of terrorism as it has of the neocons who have appropriated the war on terror as carte blanche for their own agenda.

Dave - I think it was the "my friends" that seemed eerily familiar. I experienced a moment of Lovecraftian horror as I realized that "David Fiore" was not a man speaking about Gerry Conway comics, but Gerry Conway comics speaking through a man...

David Fiore

I see what you mean, my friend. My greatest fear now is that I'll take to spouting Father Dowling dialogue... Is Conwayitis a progressive disease? We'll find out!

Dave

matt rossi

You do realize that if Dave is Gerry Conway comics that speak as a man, that makes me the Mantlo Factor, yes?

Dave Van Domelen

Matt, now it's starting to sound like the basis for one of those LJ meme quizzes. "What comics writer are you the mouthpiece for?"

aardvark

With some trepidation at showing my ignorance of things Millar, could someone give a quick explanation of Millar's neo-conservative storytelling? I ask out of ignorance, not to challenge the label... I just haven't read much of him other than his Authority work (mediocre), some Ultimate X-Men (fun), and Red Son (disappointing). Which books, especially? Any particularly good posts anywhere that could bring me up to speed?

Marc

Millar's own politics would appear to be vaguely, shallowly leftist, but since taking over The Authority he's written superheroes in precisely the bombastic, arrogant, high collateral damage style that's been adopted by the Bush neocons. The best example is The Ultimates. Millar has bragged about setting a new trend for writing Captain America as a conservative - despite the fact that as a product of New Deal liberalism who's been frozen in ice since 1945, Cap would find today's conservatives a completely alien species even if he'd been a registered Republican. (Not that he wouldn't find the modern left pretty alien, too - there's a lot of mileage in a portrayal of Cap as a feisty New Deal liberal in unfamiliar surroundings, but that's not what Millar has served up thus far.) Morrison has as much as said that the Ultramarines are a shot at Millar's Ultimates.

Marc

Not to follow up on my own comments, but this article from the Sunday Herald throws a little more light onto the politics of The Ultimates. Millar is staunchly anti-Bush, but his style of writing the Ultimates is easily adapted to the rhetoric of the war in Iraq. It looks like Ultimates 2 will do exactly what Morrison has done in JLA Classified, using the same tools to represent Bush's foreign policy, albeit more directly and with more fence-sitting.

Incidentally, I'm a little pissed off that the Sunday Herald (a Scottish paper) says Millar's antiwar sentiments have "inspired hundreds of patriotic American comic readers to sign an online petition to have him sacked." No, those are hundreds of hawkish American comic readers, or conservative American comic readers, or hypersensitive American comic readers who don't want to hear any opposing points of view.

Blacklisters, however, even pathetic little failed ones, are just about the farthest thing from patriotic.

the aardvark

The Sunday Herald article says that Mark Millar "achieved international renown when he and artist Frank Quitely created The Authority." I think Warren Ellis should sue.

Marc

The article's error, not Millar's, according to Fanboy Rampage.

Marc

However, now Rich Johnston has a great column (scroll down) suggesting that these "errors" are in fact a canny marketing scheme on Millar's part.

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